• A Quest for a Theory of Everything - Physics
    Physics is the foundation for a Theory of Everything. ToeQuest is a science-based website and emphasizes a scientific approach to theory development. Although we venture to the fringe of science, and maybe a step or two beyond, we avoid the crackpot arena. We seek out individuals with a great ideas who are willing to share, explore, and help others.
    Are you willing to share your ideas with like-minded others? If so, join our TOE Quest today!
  • Exquisite Map of Cosmos Hints at Universe's Birth

    Space.com -- A map of the universe based on its oldest light is giving astronomers hope that they may be able to answer some of the deepest questions of the cosmos, including how it got started.

    Scientists met this week at the University of California, Davis to pore over the treasure trove of data published two months ago from the European Planck spacecraft. The observatory measures what's called the cosmic microwave background light spread across the sky that dates from soon after the Big Bang that kick-started the universe.

    "We have the best map ever of the cosmic microwave background, and that shows us what the universe was like 370,000 years after the Big Bang," said Charles Lawrence, a scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California who is the lead U.S. scientist on the Planck project. Lawrence and other researchers summed up the consequences of the meeting, called the Davis Cosmic Frontiers Conferences, in a call to reporters Friday (May 24). [Gallery: Planck Spacecraft Sees Big Bang Relics]

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) was first discovered in 1964, and since then a series of experiments, culminating in Planck, have measured it in increasing detail, providing cosmologists a direct line to test theories about the beginnings of the universe. Planck launched in 2009, and the recent data represent the product of the spacecraft's first 15.5 months of observations.

    "Rarely in the history of science has there been such a triumphant transformation from really complete ignorance to really deep insights in just a few decades," said Andreas Albrecht, chair of the University of California, Davis Department of Physics.

    Continue reading ...
    Comments 6 Comments
    1. jamison2000e's Avatar
      jamison2000e -
      Only as far as we can *see* which will never be infinitely... 8)
    1. Fredrick's Avatar
      Fredrick -
      370,000 years after the Big Bang is according to me incorrect. I am not referring to the specific age, but rather to the inference when the Big Bang occurred.

      As I see it, the cosmic microwave background = the start of the material universe (= the Big Bang). Just like photons do not appear at the center of the sun, but rather at the surface, matter did not appear in the center of Area X. The cosmic microwave background shows the start in all its glory. It is the singe of energy becoming matter, while at the center of Area X no materialization took place.

      Scientists claim that 96% of our universe is non-materialized energy (Dark Matter, Dark Energy). So where was this during the start of our universe? As I see it, Dark Matter was at the center, while Dark Energy was on the outside. Dark Matter had a radius of 370,000 light years, which is a diameter of 740,000 light years. That is one big large Mother Load from which that 4% materialization got pushed out.

      Instead of claiming our universe to be 13.7 billion years old, the universe is in this view 740,000 years younger (about 13.6 billion).

      So, what we see in the cosmic microwave background is the Big Bang itself. Maybe it's more appropriate to call it the Big Birth?
    1. chazzysaw's Avatar
      chazzysaw -
      Astronomers always base the age of our universe on the strength of their telescope. The stronger the telescope the farther they see, the older the universe. I believe there is more universe to be discovered out side of the universal map. The universe is much, much older than predicted. Personally I feel there was no beginning it always was and will be.
    1. dipayankar's Avatar
      dipayankar -
      Rather than search for the TOE, we should be looking for what happened prior to the Big Bang. Because during the Big Bang all the forces had combined to become one single entity (the infinium). What caused all the forces to combine during Big Bang?
    1. spacedout's Avatar
      spacedout -
      I believe the universe needs Planck units but Planck units of space would be compacted and lack movement due to compression causing inline steps that freeze time. Planck units of space propagate light through these standing wave. Light propagation should come after the formation of Planck cubes reverberating a universal frequency that governs the size of particles and their charge and spin.
    1. StevenH's Avatar
      StevenH -
      Quote Originally Posted by chazzysaw View Post
      Astronomers always base the age of our universe on the strength of their telescope. The stronger the telescope the farther they see, the older the universe. I believe there is more universe to be discovered out side of the universal map. The universe is much, much older than predicted. Personally I feel there was no beginning it always was and will be.
      This is my first post so I'm not sure what it's going to look like.
      At any rate, my gut feeling on this is that you are probably correct.
      Not only do we NOT "know" the age of the Universe, we also don't know the mass of it.
      The deep field study by the Hubble Telescope showed us that there is a lot more out there than we thought. And that's just in one empty spot in the sky.
      Who knows what is behind the stuff we see easily?

      I also suspect that what we use for measurements is subject to enormous error.

      It seems that we'd be better off if we just said, "We don't know yet".
  • Video - Physics

  • Latest Physics Discussions