Page 10 of 12 FirstFirst ... 6789101112 LastLast
Results 91 to 100 of 117

Thread: What is consciousness made of?

  1. #91
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    8,171
    Blog Entries
    15
    Likes Received
    12
    Likes Given
    5


    Did you find this post helpful? Yes | No

    Re: What is consciousness made of?

    [QUOTE=Rybo;147543]
    Quote Originally Posted by Drifter View Post
    Probably the easiest way to describe it Ry is Consciousness has 2 parts, a latent iinactive state like a virus or a meme and also a carrier state like a disease, the active state, the carrier w/potential, is infected (in this example 'with consciousness') and has symptoms but isn't 'contageous' per se because everyone has the same or just about genomes and memes, in their own active conscious and inactive unconscious states of Consciousness?

    Ok so in your outline we should have Consciousness first ergo

    Consciousness > Primal Points(s) > Spanda Pulse > blood pressure( ? ) in that order?

    Or maybe there are in the first catagory like the four I give for "U"niverse, however, in my set conscious is resultant of teh latter middle two ilel physical, quasi-physical lead to accesst to metaphysical mind.

    }{---
    }0{--- Hi, I am here currently
    {O}---- Hi, I might also be here
    }oo{-----If I am here, I will be exiting later :--)

    I left blank for nothingness infinity. The only addition I could maybe make is that of biolgoical, should it also exist eternally in "U"niverse.

    Rybo
    Lets try this?

    Consciousness and Awareness – What’s the Difference?

    September 5th, 2010 Graham No comments

    If you are seeing this picture and understanding what it represents, then you are conscious. This is an indisputable fact. The knowledge of your own consciousness is the one and only fact of which you can be absolutely certain. Everything else that you might think that you know is an inference or assumption, and therefore cannot be known with certainty.
    The definition of consciousness that Francis Lucille has often used is based on this fact, and may be stated thus:
    Consciousness is whatever is reading these words right now, and understanding them.
    This is an experiential definition, and it seems to be necessary to define it this way because consciousness is not a “thing” or object per se, and therefore cannot be defined in terms of other things. Our minds simply cannot grasp the nature of consciousness, because of its lack on tangibility. Hence it can only be pointed to. And yet, it is apparent that consciousness is what we are ourselves. Whenever we refer to “I”, it is this very same consciousness to which we refer. So in the scheme of things, it seems important that we understand it!
    An interesting point to note is that, according to Lucille’s definition (and also as he has pointed out himself), there is no distinction between consciousness and awareness. The two words are treated synonymously, and are used interchangeably.
    Those of you who have an interest in non-duality will likely also have come across Sri Maharaj Nisargadatta. (A famous book documenting some of his discourses, I Am That (PDF), is available as a free download.) Nisargadatta spoke extensively about consciousness, but he also referred to awareness and made a distinction between the two. The following quote from the book illustrates this especially well.
    What you need is to be aware of being aware. Be aware deliberately and consciously, broaden and deepen the field of awareness. You are always conscious of the mind, but you are not aware of yourself as being conscious.
    But what exactly is the distinction here? This caused me some confusion, and apparently it has confused others too. The easy way out here might be to remember that we are talking about the intangible, and just paper over the cracks by suggesting that it’s not surprising that there would seem to be inconsistencies between intangible things when we try to conceptualise them. But in fact on further investigation there my be some rationality in the distinction after all. These further quotes from Nisargadatta may make things a little clearer.
    The mind produces thoughts ceaselessly, even when you do not look at them. When you know what is going on in your mind, you call it consciousness. This is your waking state — your consciousness shifts from sensation to sensation, from perception to perception, from idea to idea, in endless succession. Then comes awareness, the direct insight into the whole of consciousness, the totality of the mind. The mind is like a river, flowing ceaselessly in the bed of the body; you identify yourself for a moment with some particular ripple and call it: ‘my thought’. All you are conscious of is your mind; awareness is the cognisance of consciousness as a whole.
    Awareness is primordial; it is the original state, beginningless, endless, uncaused, unsupported, without parts, without change. Consciousness is on contact, a reflection against a surface, a state of duality. There can be no consciousness without awareness, but there can be awareness without consciousness, as in deep sleep. Awareness is absolute, consciousness is relative to its content; consciousness is always of something. Consciousness is partial and changeful, awareness is total, changeless, calm and silent. And it is the common matrix of every experience.
    So the distinction that Nisargadatta is making appears to be between a mental/bodily consciousness (ie. our thoughts and sensory inputs) versus a broader awareness which extends beyond mentations and sensations. And this does appear to have a parallel with Lucille’s description of perception versus apperception (mentioned, for example, here).
    “Perception” refers to the experience of an object (phenomenon, that which appears, thought, body sensation or external sense perception), whereas “apperception” refers to the experience of the subject (noumenon, that to which that which appears appears). The human mind is the experience of perceptions, but apperception takes place beyond the mind. (Extract from Francis Answers No 27)
    Therefore I propose the following simple explanation of the distinction between consciousness and awareness.
    • Nisargadatta’s “Consciousness” = Rybo’s / Lucille's mentations and perceptions (particular to a body/mind)
    • Nisargadatta’s “Awareness” = Rybo’s / Lucille's consciousness (both perceptions and apperceptions, both particular to a body/mind and universal)
    Having sorted out that little conundrum to the (hopefully not overly smug) satisfaction of my own mind, the next question is what an apperception is, and how on earth we can be aware of something that is not within our own mind or body?
    Ah the joys of non-dual investigation!


    Categories: Spirituality Tags: Advaita, Consciousness, Franics Lucille, Nisargadatta, Philosophy

  2. #92
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    8,171
    Blog Entries
    15
    Likes Received
    12
    Likes Given
    5


    Did you find this post helpful? Yes | No

    Re: What is consciousness made of?

    What's the difference between Consciousness and Awareness? ~Nizargadatta Maharaj
    http://www.prahlad.org/disciples/pre...0AWARENESS.htm

  3. #93
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    8,171
    Blog Entries
    15
    Likes Received
    12
    Likes Given
    5


    Did you find this post helpful? Yes | No

    Re: What is consciousness made of?


  4. #94
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    8,171
    Blog Entries
    15
    Likes Received
    12
    Likes Given
    5


    Did you find this post helpful? Yes | No

    Re: What is consciousness made of?

    How is Jungian analysis different from other forms of analysis?


    The fundamental goal of Jungian analysis is to build a vital relationship between the conscious and unconscious parts of the mind so that psychic development can be ongoing. Rather than regarding the unconscious merely as the repository of repressed memories, Jung viewed it as the wellspring of psychic energy and healing. He acknowledged the importance of understanding how the deficits and trauma of our history influence us, but stressed the need to look to the future as well, to understand our inner urge to become the unique individuals that we each have the potential to be. Like other forms of analysis, Jungian analysis recognizes the important roles of sex, aggression, and human relationships in our daily lives, but it also respects our needs for creative expression, meaning, spirituality, and growth as essential aspects of the human psyche.
    Jung believed that we develop symptoms when we are stuck in old patterns and fail to integrate creative potentials within our personality. Often such symptoms motivate us to begin analysis. If we do not understand the deeper causes underlying those symptoms and focus merely on their relief, problems are likely to resurface in other ways, such as difficulties in relationships or emotional blocks.
    To forge a connection with the unconscious Jungians utilize symbols that emerge spontaneously in patients’ fantasies, dreams, creative projects and daily experience. Many of these images are archetypal and also appear in myths and religious traditions. Concentrating on such images [and wisdom] generates energy that catalyzes impulses to explore new realms of possibility and action that leads to personal transformation.

  5. #95
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    8,171
    Blog Entries
    15
    Likes Received
    12
    Likes Given
    5


    Did you find this post helpful? Yes | No

    Re: What is consciousness made of?

    The Linga Sarira or Subtle Body=Vehicle for the manifestation of Shakti ("Planes" higher / lower ) http://www.answers.com/topic/shakti
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subtle_body

  6. #96
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    8,171
    Blog Entries
    15
    Likes Received
    12
    Likes Given
    5


    Did you find this post helpful? Yes | No

    Re: What is consciousness made of?

    THE MESSAGE OF THE UPANISHADS
    To understand the message of the Upanishads, one may get some help from Fig. 3 which shows concentric shells which are four in total. This figure also shows a direction indicated by an arrow. The smaller the radii of the shells the subtler are these things for the humans to understand them. For example, a human body represented by the outermost shell is the easiest to see and comprehend. A physical pain in the body can be very easily explained even by a child but it would be relatively difficult for him to explain his mental conditions. Our body has five sense organs or they can also be called as the equipments for the perception of the external world. The mind contains memory and it is also a seat for internal emotions and disturbances. Therefore it is referred to as the internal equipment which shows the internal condition of a person. The mind is subtler than the body. If we go further inside, we reach the intellect which is the ability of discrimination. To achieve this ability one should be able to judge right or wrong actions etc.. The subtlest of all is the Atman which is considered to be pure consciousness in the Upanishads. It is qualitiless and is not affected by sorrow or pleasure experienced by the human beings. This is the Real Self and not separate from the Creator. It can neither be wetted by water nor burnt by fire. It lives through the Kalpas. The Atman is not affected by birth or death. These are only the outer three shells which are affected.




    To experience the blissful state, one has to withdraw from the external world and focus internally and transcend the experiencing of space and time. This concept is called the meditation.
    We go through pains or pleasures when we experience the outside world through our external instruments (ears, eyes etc.) or through our memory of different types of events (mind). If we can try to focus one - pointedly with dispassion or with indifference, our mind will be calm like the surface of a lake without any ripples. Our witnessing of the external world creates response within us just like ripples in the water. If we continue for sometime like this, we would be meditating and would go beyond the concept of space and time. It would require considerable practice to achieve perfection which is called the state of Samadhi. In this state one experiences the blissful state which cannot be experienced through sensory pleasures.
    To those of us who are not convinced that they are in some way represented by Fig. 3, what happens if some one else asks us who we are ? What is going to be our reply? Are we just the body, for example - hand, feet, eyes etc.? The answer is no, because we can still be alive without any of these and we can have awareness without any of these. The same thing applies to mind and intellect because different people have very different qualities of these, and also, all of these undergo changes as a person is born and then goes through the life process; but there is something which remains the same. The thing which is always there, is the Atman. The omnipresence of the Atman is explained from our daily life observation. When one living being (Jiva) sees another one suffering from sorrow or pain, the first one also experiences the pain, and such a pain is not experienced when a non living thing is destroyed. This process of the identification between the two living beings must be felt through a continuum or a medium. Thus the Atman must be omnipresent. It is qualitiless because we cannot discern it by any known qualities that are known to us through our sense organs.

  7. #97
    Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    12,059
    Blog Entries
    7
    Likes Received
    119
    Likes Given
    109


    Did you find this post helpful? Yes | No

    Re: What is consciousness made of?

    Quote Originally Posted by Drifter View Post
    What's the difference between Consciousness and Awareness? ~Nizargadatta Maharaj
    http://www.prahlad.org/disciples/pre...0AWARENESS.htm
    Thanks for this link mate,it resonates with every fibre of my being,that should tell me something about awareness?

    regards michael.
    Humilty,coupled with boldness,surprises truth to
    reveal herself?

  8. #98
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    8,171
    Blog Entries
    15
    Likes Received
    12
    Likes Given
    5


    Did you find this post helpful? Yes | No

    Re: What is consciousness made of?

    Quote Originally Posted by mkirkpatrick View Post
    Thanks for this link mate,it resonates with every fibre of my being,that should tell me something about awareness?

    regards michael.
    I've been on this path for sometime.

    It's only and ever a compilation
    of mind moved by spirit
    into an ever expanding,
    all-encompssing direction.

  9. #99
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    8,171
    Blog Entries
    15
    Likes Received
    12
    Likes Given
    5


    Did you find this post helpful? Yes | No

    Re: What is consciousness made of?

    Quote Originally Posted by RascalPuff View Post
    Are we talking beyond black body radiation, photons, wave mechanics, fields, Particles?
    What is consciousness made of. (What's the matter?)
    Undeniably;

    All over the above consitute matter and Consciousness: Causality

    Matter is the collective agregate of the unseend the seen both subtle and gross

    Some of matter consciousness sentience is the animation of the spirit.

    And others emote in the brain body organism as hearing, seeing, smelling, tasteing and touching .

    So were are all on same page for discussion: http://www.psychceu.com/jung/sharplexicon.html

  10. #100
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    8,171
    Blog Entries
    15
    Likes Received
    12
    Likes Given
    5


    Did you find this post helpful? Yes | No

    Re: What is consciousness made of?

    Quote Originally Posted by Drifter View Post
    How is Jungian analysis different from other forms of analysis?


    The fundamental goal of Jungian analysis is to build a vital relationship between the conscious and unconscious parts of the mind so that psychic development can be ongoing. Rather than regarding the unconscious merely as the repository of repressed memories, Jung viewed it as the wellspring of psychic energy and healing. He acknowledged the importance of understanding how the deficits and trauma of our history influence us, but stressed the need to look to the future as well, to understand our inner urge to become the unique individuals that we each have the potential to be. Like other forms of analysis, Jungian analysis recognizes the important roles of sex, aggression, and human relationships in our daily lives, but it also respects our needs for creative expression, meaning, spirituality, and growth as essential aspects of the human psyche.
    Jung believed that we develop symptoms when we are stuck in old patterns and fail to integrate creative potentials within our personality. Often such symptoms motivate us to begin analysis. If we do not understand the deeper causes underlying those symptoms and focus merely on their relief, problems are likely to resurface in other ways, such as difficulties in relationships or emotional blocks.
    To forge a connection with the unconscious Jungians utilize symbols that emerge spontaneously in patients’ fantasies, dreams, creative projects and daily experience. Many of these images are archetypal and also appear in myths and religious traditions. Concentrating on such images [and wisdom] generates energy that catalyzes impulses to explore new realms of possibility and action that leads to personal transformation.
    Worth reviewing imho

Page 10 of 12 FirstFirst ... 6789101112 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. What is the universe made of - and where did it come from?
    By melanie in forum Logic and Reasoning
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-10-2012, 02:36 PM
  2. Is global warming mostly man-made?
    By Robert in forum Polls
    Replies: 384
    Last Post: 08-20-2011, 04:55 PM
  3. What are Strings made of???
    By Guille in forum String Theory
    Replies: 122
    Last Post: 01-07-2010, 09:42 AM
  4. The most accurate measurements ever made!
    By neutralino in forum Quantum Physics
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-14-2007, 04:46 PM
  5. What are Quanta made of?
    By Guille in forum Quantum Physics
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 05-01-2006, 01:59 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •